Global citizenship

A.Y. 2020/2021
9
Max ECTS
60
Overall hours
SSD
SPS/07
Language
English
Learning objectives
This course aims to shed light on long-term and articulated processes of global citizenship. Based on diachronic and cross-national comparative analysis, the course illustrates the essential role which citizenship provides for the foundations of democracy, at a time when populist regressions become increasingly more visible throughout the democratic word. In particular, the course integrates the two dimensions of 'political' and 'civic' citizenship, linking systematically the analysis of the public sphere with that of policy-making. This allows for considering a large volume of stakeholders and their interventions across the civic and the political dimension, while at the same time advancing a novel framework of analysis that goes beyond standard models of 'epistemological citizenship' with its usual reference to individual and group rights.
Expected learning outcomes
By the end of the course, students will acquire the basis for articulating diachronic and cross-national variations of citizenship in holistic legal, political and sociological sense, in the context of globalising economic, migratory and cultural developments. At the same time, students will develop critical thinking and independent judgement, engaging with the idea that global citizenship is not only global in its geographically prosaic terms, but in its inclusive force that has the potential to cut across social and political cleavages of different kinds. Students will also learn that citizenship does not happen only in terms of broad, abstract structural forces, but needs to be assessed in the direct intervention of specific groups and human agency in general. In so doing, students will learn much more about citizenship from below, looking at the intervention of active citizens and civil society within an ever-wide opening of global institutions and governance.
Course syllabus and organization

Single session

Responsible
Lesson period
Third trimester
In case the Covid crisis continues until third term, classes will be run online via Microsoft Teams e Skype in line with University indications. Materials discussed in class will be distributed on the specific Ariel website of this course. Some work will be conducted in "modalità asincrona" by distributing the relevant material with audio comments via Ariel.
Course syllabus
Week 1: "Citizenship from civil to social rights"
The first week of course will focus on different types of rights at the core of citizenship according to usual distinction into 'civil', 'political' and 'social'. Students will acquire a number of conceptual and analytical tools drawing on course slides and reading extracts from the following:
Pocock, "The Ideal of Citizenship Since Classical Times"
Marshall, "Citizenship and Social Class"


Week 2: "The cultural turn"
The second week of course will focus the distinction between 'individual' and 'group' rights. Students will acquire a number of conceptual and analytical tools drawing on course slides and reading extracts from the following:
Anderson, "Imagined Communities"
Kymlicka, "Multicultural Citizenship"


Week 3: "Post-national citizenship"
The third week of course will focus on decoupling of 'rights' and 'identities'. Students will acquire a number of conceptual and analytical tools drawing on course slides and reading extracts from the following:
Jacobson, "Rights across Borders"
Soysal, "Limits of Citizenship"


Week 4: "Cosmopolitan citizenship"
The fourth week of course will focus on the notion of 'cosmopolitanism' at the core of contemporary discussions of global citizenship. Students will acquire a number of conceptual and analytical tools drawing course slides and reading extracts from the following:
Nussbaum, "Patriotism and Cosmopolitanism"
Parekh, "Cosmopolitanism and Global Citizenship"


Week 5: "Global citizenship from below"
The fifth week of course will focus on political participation and practices of citizenship. Students will acquire a number of conceptual and analytical tools drawing on course slides and reading extracts from the following:
Isin, "Citizenship in Flux"
Imig and Tarrow, "Contentious Europeans"


Week 6: "The relational field of citizenship"
The sixth week of course will take citizenship as a field made of actors and their relationships. Students will acquire a number of conceptual and analytical tools drawing on course slides and reading extracts from the following:
Cinalli, "Citizenship and the Political Integration of Muslims"
Keck and Sikkink, "Transnational Advocacy Networks"


Week 7: "Citizenship revolutions"
The seventh week of course will focus on the 'ontological' content of citizenship, dealing with main historical and conceptual shifts in its development. Students will acquire a number of conceptual and analytical tools drawing on course slides and reading extracts from the following:
Cinalli and Jacobson, "Citizenship's Third Revolution"
Somers, "Genealogies of Citizenship"


Week 8: "Migrant citizenship as a borderless field"
The eighth week of course will focus on the tight relationship between migration and citizenship. Students will acquire a number of conceptual and analytical tools drawing on course slides and reading extracts from the following:
Favell, "Immigration, Integration and Mobility"
Nyers, "Migrant Citizenships and Autonomous Mobilities"


Week 9: "Vulnerability and solidarity: the future of citizenship in Europe"
The ninth week of course will focus on the central role of solidarity for citizenship in Europe. Students will acquire a number of conceptual and analytical tools drawing on course slides and reading extracts from the following:
Cinalli and Trenz, "Solidarity contestation in the public sphere"
Cinalli et al., "Solidarity in the media and public contention over refugees in Europe"


Week 10: "Global citizenship: conclusive statements"
This final week of course will sum up the topics and themes of course. Students will take an active role in the formulation of concluding remarks, drawing on overall course slides and readings.
Prerequisites for admission
No preliminary knowledge in the field is required. Students must respect any prerequisite according to their own degree course.
Teaching methods
Teaching will be held through regular classroom-taught lectures as well as weekly tutorials so as to bridge theoretical and empirical scope of the whole programme through its weekly lessons. Attendance is compulsory.
Teaching Resources
Pocock, "The Ideal of Citizenship Since Classical Times"
Marshall, "Citizenship and Social Class"
Anderson, "Imagined Communities"
Kymlicka, "Multicultural Citizenship"
Jacobson, "Rights across Borders"
Soysal, "Limits of Citizenship"
Nussbaum, "Patriotism and Cosmopolitanism"
Parekh, "Cosmopolitanism and Global Citizenship"
Isin, "Citizenship in Flux"
Imig and Tarrow, "Contentious Europeans"
Cinalli, "Citizenship and the Political Integration of Muslims"
Keck and Sikkink, "Transnational Advocacy Networks"
Cinalli and Jacobson, "Citizenship's Third Revolution"
Somers, "Genealogies of Citizenship"
Favell, "Immigration, Integration and Mobility"
Nyers, "Migrant Citizenships and Autonomous Mobilities"
Cinalli and Trenz, "Solidarity contestation in the public sphere"
Cinalli, Lahusen, Trenz, "Solidarity in the media and public contention over refugees in Europe"
Assessment methods and Criteria
Students will be assessed via a final oral exam (final grade expressed in n/30). This exam focuses on concepts, theoretical perspectives and empirical cases that are tackled throughout the various readings of programme.
SPS/07 - GENERAL SOCIOLOGY - University credits: 9
Lessons: 60 hours
Professor: Cinalli Manlio
Professor(s)